Saturday, March 21, 2020

"It's Only Going to Get Worse."

by John Boodhansingh of Zero Mindfulness

[Updated 5/12/20: Added new section at end: “An Afterthought: Quality of Life.”]



“It’s only going to get worse [before it gets better].”

When?

Do you say this?

Do you say this repeatedly, almost like a mantra, whenever societal hardship arises?

If so, I ask you: When does it end?

How awful does our world (or the latest pandemic, war, famine, political regime, etc.) have to get, by your reckoning, before it will cease to get any worse?

What point must we reach before you see it as acceptable either for a clear-cut end to occur or for things to at least turn around?

Can we turn around right now?

Could we have started turning around one year or three decades ago, but maybe it’s just hard for you to see because your fear- and belief-derived (-deranged) perceptions are unhealthy, and you believe the world, especially the media, as they forever reinforce their negative viewpoint into you?

Or can’t we turn things around until there’s a one world government and everybody is RFID-chipped and jacked up on GMO food and toxic vaccinations while living in slave camps?

Or does WWIII have to happen first, and, maybe, simultaneously, “The Elect” will be whisked into heaven while those who remain will have to fight to the death as the planet dies?

When is enough enough?

We, Creators

To this last question you may reply that it’s not up to you to decide when enough is enough.

How sure are you of this?

What if it is up to you?

People are so bent on avoiding their own thoughts as causes while blaming others for the injustices of the world, all while waiting for the world to get better by way of governments, gods, or guns.

Even for many of those who do acknowledge that personal responsibility is required, they still only take responsibility for themselves when that responsibility is convenient, when it doesn’t stir up too much repressed emotion, say, or when a favored “authority” figure advises it.

But isn’t it true that where we are right now is an accumulation of everything we’ve thought, said, and done in the past?

Yes.

There’s nowhere else to place the blame.

To change, then, to improve, it only makes sense that, individually and collectively, we have to think, speak, and act differently.

The Path Less Traveled

However awful this world may seem, things don’t have to turn out this way.

Or maybe they do, since these are the things that the majority of the population pours their energy into.

And what is attentive energy but the energy of creation?

For me, I choose to place my attention elsewhere.

This isn’t to say that I avert my eyes while standing cold and careless at a distance.

But for the most part, the things that so heavily trouble others and once troubled me have nothing to do with me now because they have nothing to do with the future I intend to create—one in which the world I live in is only going to get better.

I hope you’ll change your mind and come with me.



An Afterthought: Quality of Life

“It’s only going to get worse [before it gets better].”
“It’s only going to get worse [before it gets better].”
“It’s only going to get worse [before it gets better].”

For me, the mere reading of this is an energy drain.

I don’t think the situation is different for anyone else, other than the fact that I am conscious of the energy drain while most people are not.

Imagine saying these words regularly. Imagine living by them and having them running in your subconscious day and night.

Through constant repetition, you gradually lower your energy, and so your perception of life must necessarily shift in parallel.

In other words, by focusing on and reinforcing the negative in this way, you gradually lower your quality of life; you gradually lower your expectations of life; you gradually lower your beliefs as to how good life can be.

It’s just like when people think, It was so much easier when we were kids. Life was so fun and free... But, well, we can't go back to that, and then they go on living heavy, meaning-less life experiences while telling themselves and others about how the world just isn't the same.

No, as grown-ups, we can't go back to being kids, and, yes, we do have to take more responsibility for ourselves and our world.

However, this doesn't at all mean we can't be freer and happier and live more easeful and joyful lives.

Although things like pandemics and earthquakes and shitty politicians certainly make for a less satisfying experience, they are not the main things we should be pointing at when we see life as more or less of an endless drama.

What we should be pointing at is the programming within us that insists on giving up, little by little, until we effectively cease imagining, much less working toward, a brighter, more loving and fulfilling future.

We shouldn’t be saying, “The world just isn’t the same,” because this kind of thing puts our attention “out there” somewhere. It leaves us feeling powerless and anxious for a savior.

What we should be saying is, “I admit, I’m not the same. I’ve lost my innocence, my freedom, my faith. Now, it’s my responsibility as a creator and human inhabitant of this world to become as I wish my world to be.”

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